You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘earthquake safety’ tag.

It’s never too early to prepare your home and family for an earthquake The earthquakes that hit Southern California last week left residents unnerved. The 6.4 magnitude quake hit near Ridgecrest last Thursday, was followed the next day by a 7.1 magnitude quake, the largest in Southern California in 20 years. The quake was also felt in Las Vegas and Mexico, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

It is never too early to prepare your home and family for an earthquake, says Alan Barbic, president of the Silicon Valley Association of REALTORS®. “We need to review and practice earthquake safety measures, so if an earthquake or any kind of disaster strikes, we will be ready.”

This is why SILVAR periodically reminds consumers of the following important earthquake safety measures for homeowners from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), California’s Department of Conservation and the USGS:

Identify Potential Hazards in Your Home and Fix Them

• Move furniture away from where people sit, sleep, or spend a lot of time. Move heavy objects to lower shelves and secure hanging objects, cabinet doors and appliances with safety straps, fasteners and adhesives. Move flammable or hazardous materials stored in garages and utility rooms to low, more secure areas.

• Replace rigid gas connections to water heaters and other gas appliances with flexible (corrugated) stainless steel gas connectors. Excess-flow gas-shutoff valves for individual appliances will stop gas flow in case of a catastrophic leak.

Create a Disaster Supply Kit and Keep it in an Accessible Location

• First aid supplies, with medications not requiring refrigeration, including spare eyeglasses and essential hygiene items

• Drinking water (minimum one gallon per person per day)

• Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location)

• Emergency cash in small bills (ATMs may not work)

• Snack foods high in calories, canned and packaged foods and cooking utensils, including a manual can opener and food and a leash or carrier for your pet

• A working flashlight with extra batteries and/or light sticks

• Baby formula or powdered milk for infants, disposable diapers, baby wipes, bottles, pacifiers and comfort items for your children, like stuffed animals and other toys

• A battery-operated radio (and spare batteries)

• Warm clothing, gloves, sturdy shoes, extra socks, blankets/sleeping bags, dust masks

• Heavy-duty plastic bags for waste and other uses

• A-B-C type fire extinguisher

• Copies of vital documents, such as insurance policies, personal identification, medical consent forms for dependents

Replace perishable items like water, food, medication and batteries on a yearly basis.

Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan

Decide how and where your family will reunite if separated during a quake. Select an out-of-state friend or relative to call and alert other relatives and friends that you are all right.

During an Earthquake, Drop! Cover! and Hold On!

If you are indoors, drop to the ground, take cover by getting under a sturdy desk or table, or stand against an interior wall. Stay away from exterior walls and windows. If you are outdoors, stay clear of buildings and power lines. If there is no shelter nearby, cover your head and neck with one arm and hand. Hold on until the shaking stops.

Advertisements

In view of the latest earthquake alert following a swarm of seismic activity in the Salton Sea on the south end of Southern California’s San Andreas fault, it is a good time to review earthquake safety measures.

The Silicon Valley Association of REALTORS® shares the following important earthquake safety measures from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), California’s Department of Conservation and the U.S. Geological Survey:

Identify Potential Hazards in Your Home and Fix Them

  • Move furniture away from where people sit, sleep, or spend a lot of time. Move heavy objects to lower shelves and secure hanging objects, cabinet doors and appliances with safety straps, fasteners and adhesives. Move flammable or hazardous materials stored in garages and utility rooms to low, more secure areas.
  • Replace rigid gas connections to water heaters and other gas appliances with flexible (corrugated) stainless steel gas connectors. Excess-flow gas-shutoff valves for individual appliances will stop gas flow in case of a catastrophic leak.

Create a Disaster Supply Kit and Keep it in an Accessible Location

  • First aid supplies, with medications not requiring refrigeration, including spare eyeglasses and essential hygiene items
  • Drinking water (minimum one gallon per person per day)
  • Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location)
  • Emergency cash in small bills (ATMs may not work)
  • Snack foods high in calories, canned and packaged foods and cooking utensils, including a manual can opener and food and a leash or carrier for your pet
  • A working flashlight with extra batteries and/or light sticks
  • Baby formula or powdered milk for infants, disposable diapers, baby wipes, bottles, pacifiers and comfort items for your children, like stuffed animals and other toys
  • A battery-operated radio (and spare batteries)
  • Warm clothing, gloves, sturdy shoes, extra socks, blankets/sleeping bags, dust masks
  • Heavy-duty plastic bags for waste and other uses
  • A-B-C type fire extinguisher
  • Copies of vital documents, such as insurance policies, personal identification, medical consent forms for dependents

Replace perishable items like water, food, medication and batteries on a yearly basis.

Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan

Decide how and where your family will reunite if separated during a quake. Select an out-of-state friend or relative to call and alert other relatives and friends that you are all right.

During an Earthquake, Drop! Cover! and Hold On!

If you are indoors, drop to the ground, take cover by getting under a sturdy desk or table, or stand against an interior wall. Stay away from exterior walls and windows. If you are outdoors, stay clear of buildings and power lines. If there is no shelter nearby, cover your head and neck with one arm and hand. Hold on until the shaking stops.

If you are driving, move the car out of traffic and stop. Avoid parking under or on bridges or overpasses, or close to trees, light posts, signs and power lines.

If you are in a mountainous area, beware of the potential for landslides. If you are near the ocean, be aware that tsunamis are associated with large earthquakes, so get to high ground.

In light of the 6.0 magnitude earthquake that struck the Napa Valley region last Sunday, the Silicon Valley Association of REALTORS® (SILVAR) is reminding homeowners to follow earthquake safety measures so they will be prepared when another earthquake strikes again.

“Majority of Californians live within 20 miles of a major earthquake fault, yet most of us tend to be lackadaisical about earthquake safety. Being prepared could save your life,” stressed SILVAR President David Tonna.

According to the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, major earthquakes registering magnitudes between 6.3 and 8.3 have occurred in California every 5.4 years, on average, for the past 200 years. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates there is a 90 percent chance that a major earthquake will strike an urban area in California within the next 30 years.

Additionally, a 2010 California Earthquake Preparedness Survey conducted by the UCLA School of Public Health found fewer than 20 percent of households have structurally reinforced their homes or had their homes inspected for earthquake resistance; only 40 percent keep the recommended minimum of three gallons of water stored per person; and only 40 percent of Californians have made family disaster plans.

SILVAR shares the following important earthquake safety measures from FEMA’s Ready Campaign site, California’s Department of Conservation and the U.S. Geological Survey:
Identify Potential Hazards in Your Home and Fix Them
• START NOW by moving furniture away from beds, sofas, or other places where people sit, sleep, or spend a lot of time. Move heavy objects to lower shelves. Move flammable or hazardous materials stored in garages and utility rooms to low, more secure areas.

• Retrofitting before an earthquake is relatively cheap, and could reduce damage and save you money.

Create a Disaster Supply Kit and keep it in an easily accessible location.
• First aid supplies, with medications not requiring refrigeration, including spare eyeglasses and essential hygiene items
• Drinking water (minimum one gallon per person per day)
• Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location)
• Emergency cash in small bills (ATMs may not work)
• Snack foods high in calories, canned and packaged foods and cooking utensils, including a manual can opener. Include food and a leash or carrier for your pet.
• A working flashlight with extra batteries.
• Baby formula, disposable diapers, baby wipes, bottles, pacifiers, powdered milk for infants and comfort items for your children, like stuffed animals and other toys
• A battery-operated radio (and spare batteries).
• Warm clothing, gloves, sturdy shoes, extra socks, blankets/sleeping bags
• Heavy-duty plastic bags for waste and other uses
• A-B-C type fire extinguisher
• Copies of vital documents, such as insurance policies, personal identification, medical consent forms for dependents.
Replace perishable items on a yearly basis.

Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan
Decide how and where your family will reunite if separated during a quake. Select an out-of-state friend or relative to call and alert other relatives and friends that you are all right.

During an Earthquake, Drop! Cover! and Hold On!
You cannot tell from the initial shaking of an earthquake if it will suddenly become intense, so drop to the ground, take cover by getting under a sturdy desk or table, and hold on to your shelter until the shaking stops.

August 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 61 other followers

Advertisements