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A Bankrate survey conducted Jan. 30-Feb. 1, 2019 found nearly two-thirds, or 63 percent of millennial homeowners have regrets about buying their home. Overall, 44 percent of American homeowners have regrets about their home purchase, according to the survey.

The most common regret cited was not factoring in unexpected maintenance or hidden costs (18 percent). Other areas of regret included feeling the house was too small (12 percent), house was too big (5 percent); house was in a bad location (8 percent); house was a poor investment (7 percent); monthly mortgage payments were too high (7 percent); and mortgage rate was not the best available (6 percent).

A lot of regret stems from high expectations and being unprepared for the home buying process, said Alan Barbic, president of the Silicon Valley Association of Realtors. “Purchasing a home is the most important decision a person can make. After spending a lot of money on the down payment, closing costs and other fees, it is likely to have an impact on a new homeowner,” said Barbic. “You can minimize buyer’s remorse by taking time to prepare for homeownership. It is not something you should rush into.”

Below are suggestions Barbic makes to take the trauma out of the home buying process:

  1. Find a professional and experienced Realtor with whom you are comfortable and trust. “Real estate is changing now that we have so much information at our finger tips. How we use that information is important. We have heard of many buyers who have made offers sight-unseen,” said Barbic. “You need a good agent whom you can trust, who knows the market and has experience handling the particular needs of homebuyers, whether it is identifying homes and neighborhoods, or negotiating for the best deal. Remember you are not just buying a home; you’re investing in your future.”

    2. Get pre-approved for a home loan right away.
    A preapproval letter sends a powerful message to the seller that you’re a serious qualified buyer and ready to go.

    3. Factor maintenance and repair costs into your budget.
    Even if you buy a new home, there will be some expenses that you did not expect.

    4. Accept that no house is ever perfect.
    Don’t get so caught up in the physical aspects of the house that you overlook issues like amenities, noise level, schools, or traffic that could have a big impact once you live in the home.

    5. Don’t get caught in a buying frenzy. Just because there is competition does not mean you should just buy anything. Even though you want to make your offer attractive, don’t neglect inspections that help ensure that your house is sound.

“Choose a home first because you love it, not solely for its future appreciation. A home’s most important function is to be a comfortable, safe place to live for you and your family,” said Barbic.

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